What Your Dental Health says about your Overall Health

Dental Health

Your smile says a lot about you. It’s the first thing many people notice, and a friendly, healthy smile can attract people to you.

If you’ve decided that a career in the dental health field is right for you, Concorde is a great place to launch your future. Here are some fun facts about teeth and important facts to know about how dental health affect your overall health.

DENTISTRY IS A RELATIVELY NEW FIELD

Before the 1800s, the dental industry didn’t really exist. Can you believe that in earlier centuries, barbers and blacksmiths would provide dental care instead of dentists? Medieval dentistry was much less specialized.

TOOTHBRUSHES AND TOOTHPASTE WERE SERIOUSLY PRIMITIVE

Long before toothbrushes and toothpaste were mass produced the way they are now, people used primitive objects like twigs instead of toothbrushes.

Instead of toothpaste, they used substances we would now find disgusting, like ashes, eggshells, and even animal bones. The first device resembling a modern toothbrush was designed by the Chinese and had a bamboo handle and boar bristles. Now that toothbrushes and toothpaste are nice and taste good, why skip brushing?

SKIPPING DENTAL CARE CAN BE DANGEROUS

A lot of people are afraid of going to the dentist. In fact, a federal health survey found that 12 percent of adults between 21 and 65 had not seen a dentist in the past five years, and that number goes up to 23 percent for older adults.

Whether due to dentist phobia or lack of access to affordable care, skipping dental care can be dangerous. Not only does regular dental care usually go with a commitment to overall health, poor dental care can increase risks of seemingly unrelated diseases like heart disease.

POOR DENTAL CARE IS LINKED TO DIABETES

Inflammation in your mouth may make diabetes more likely by lowering your ability to regulate your blood sugar. Dental problems and blood sugar problems often go together, though experts aren’t sure why. Dental health programs are necessary to fight the effects of diabetes on teeth and gums.

YET ANOTHER REASON NOT TO SMOKE

You probably already know that smoking is bad for almost every part of your body. Your teeth are no exception! Smoking makes your mouth a mess by causing stained and yellow teeth. What’s worse is that it can also cause bone loss in the jaw, increases the buildup of plaque and tartar on your teeth, and increases your risk of oral cancer.

GUM DISEASE IS REVERSIBLE

One of the most important benefits of dental health programs is the ability to discover periodontal (gum) disease in its early stages. When periodontal disease is found early, you can often stop it from getting worse. Better dental hygiene, more frequent dental visits and a few lifestyle changes can prevent gum disease.

Having clean, healthy teeth and gums can improve self-esteem and overall health. If you want to help others feel confident and healthy about their smiles, choosing training from the dental health programs at Concorde will put you on the right path.

Dental hygienists

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Lucy Vang | Medical Assistant Graduate

“Concorde was one of my best vehicles that helped me gain the confidence I needed to change my life. … It all started with a vision, a will and Concorde.”

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“I have taken the MA program and the LVN program. Concorde is a wonderful school. There is a difference between passion and a paycheck, and most of my instructors had a passion for what they do. The program was challenging but well worth it. I love this college!”