Tips for Being Punctual

Being on time is a key to the success of any student, especially one engaged in health care training. Being late can become a bad habit if you let it. Learning to be punctual means we have to adjust deeply entrench patterns of behavior.

We at Concorde want our students to be successful. And, let’s face it, many situations in life require that we be punctual. For many of us, being on time and staying on a schedule is a daily battle. If you think expectations are high regarding punctuality in health care training, just wait until you become employed. Most employers expect you to be on time for the rest of your adult life.

StudyMagazine.com recently published a list of six tips that could be the key to breaking those tardiness habits and put you on schedule for good.

Health care training student guide: Six tips for being punctual

  1. Adopt a new mindset. Remind yourself of the benefits of being on time – less stress, less embarrassment, being viewed as reliable and diligent and less confusion in class over topics you might have missed.
  2. Plan in advance. Decide what you’re going to wear the night before. You can even lay out your clothes so you can easily see them in your semicomatose state the next morning. Decide what you’re going to have for breakfast.
  3. Pack ahead. Don’t leave the job of packing your bag and searching for your cell phone to the last minute. Pack your lunch, textbooks or whatever else you need the night before and have them ready to go beside the door.
  4. Leave time for delays. Many of us travel to school or health care training in high traffic areas. Delays routinely come up. Add 15-20 minutes to your normal travel time to compensate for the inevitable delays.
  5. Set the clock ahead. This doesn’t work for everyone, but some swear by it. Try setting the clock ahead 5-10 minutes to trick yourself into getting out the door on time.
  6. Go to bed on time. If you’re usually late because you sleep in too long, try going to bed early when you know you have to be in health care training the next morning. Going to bed at the same time each night helps your body get into a routine, making it easier to get up at the same time each morning.

Don’t be afraid to reach out to others

Asking others for suggestions, especially those you envy for their seemingly effortless punctuality, can give you ideas on how to improve. If you’ve made progress in being on time, reward yourself. A little commendation can go a long way in the battle against being late. Your health care training will thank you for your promptness!

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